Kohlrabi Cuisine

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kohlrabi-cuisine

Star Wars fans may wonder if George Lucas used the ridiculous-looking Kohlrabi as inspiration for some of his creatures (have you seen the new Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker?). Kohlrabi is a great item to grow in our region because it is relatively disease and pest resistant, and it’s good for you and the environment. Go Kohlrabi!

Here are some Kohlrabi facts and tips:

  • Eat it raw or cooked.
  • Peel it!
  • You can eat the leaves.
  • Separate the leaves from the bulb to store. Leaves go in a bag, the bulb in the fridge crisper.
  • Kohlrabi is crunchy, mildly spicy, and sweet.
  • Amazing in soups.
  • Quick Fix: shave, grate or cut into thin strips, toss with chopped apples and vinaigrette… Voila!

The website thekitchn.com offers a great kohlrabi guide in the article 5 Tasty Ways to Prepare Kohlrabi: raw, soups, fritters, roasted, and steamed.

In Your Bag: Week of December 30th

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Here’s what you can expect to find in Field Goods fruit and vegetable bags for this week. At-a-glance list is below, scroll for more details!

Fruit & Vegetable Bags

Family, Standard, and Small Bags Include:

  • Kipfler Potatoes
  • Apple Cider
  • Yellow & Red Onions
  • Cranberries
  • Butterhead Lettuce
  • Soldier Beans

Single Bags Include:

  • Kipfler Potatoes
  • Apple Cider
  • Yellow & Red Onions
  • Cranberries
  • Butterhead Lettuce

Carb-Conscious Bags Include:

  • Butterhead Lettuce
  • Soldier Beans
  • Yellow & Red Onions
  • Spring Mix
  • Curly Kale

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King Kipfler

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roasted-fingerling-kipfler-potatoes

Richard Guardi of Skymeadow Farms grows these outstanding potatoes specially for Field Goods. Richard is our guy for specialty potatoes!

The Kipfler (also known as Austrian Crescent Potatoes) is a type of fingerling. They have deep yellow flesh with a waxy and firm texture making it a perfect potato for salads or roasting. The name is of Austrian descent with “kipfel” translating to croissant, appropriately given since the yellow potato resembles the popular pastry. Keeping to its roots, these potatoes can get big, so if you’re looking at something that more closely resembles a toddler’s foot than an adult finger, odds are you have a Kipfler in your hand.

We also have another Germanic item for you this week… the super special Spätzle is our Pasta of the Week! It is a traditional egg noodle made with local milk and farm fresh eggs.

In Your Bag: Week of December 23rd

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Here’s what you can expect to find in Field Goods fruit and vegetable bags for this week. At-a-glance list is below, scroll for more details!

Fruit & Vegetable Bags

Family, Standard, and Small Bags Include:

  • Butterhead Lettuce
  • Watermelon Radish
  • Parsnips
  • Jester Squash
  • Cranberries
  • Garlic

Single Bags Include:

  • Butterhead Lettuce
  • Watermelon Radish
  • Parsnips
  • Jester Squash
  • Cranberries

Carb-Conscious Bags Include:

  • Butterhead Lettuce
  • Watermelon Radish
  • Parsnips
  • Garlic
  • Spinach

Read More

Underappreciated Butterhead Lettuce

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butterhead-lettuce

Lettuce tell you what the deal is… Nutritionists and dietitians rank leafy greens as the easiest way to bulk up your vitamin intake. Vitamins including A, C, and K practically radiate from these fronds! This leafy green veggie helps fight inflammation and other related diseases like diabetes and cancer.

Butterhead lettuces have soft, buttery-textured leaves that form very loose “heads”. They boast a mild, sweet and succulent flavor. As its name suggests, butterhead lettuce is so tender that it melts in the mouth like butter, particularly the heart, when the lettuce is picked. It forms a loose head of large leaves resembling an open rose.

Historical FYI: Butterhead lettuce originated in the Mediterranean basin. It was originally cultivated in ancient Egypt for the extraction of oil from its seeds. There is evidence of the plant appearing as early as 2680 BC. It also appears in various medieval writings from 1098 to 1179 and is specifically mentioned as a medicinal herb.