Behold, Golden (Snack) Hour Is Upon Us!

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We love to snack here at Field Goods (who doesn’t) and we are all about the healthy snack. While we’ve got some obvious snack choices this week (cherries, broccoli, peas), we’ve also got some great snacks-in-the-rough. All we need is a mandoline! (Don’t have one? Get one! You’ll use it all the time). We can take all kinds of stuff: zucchini (try out our golden zucchini in this week’s basket!), kohlrabi, radishes, etc. and make them into chips and fries. Slice to the appropriate thickness, toss with oil & seasonings, and bake. Simple, healthy snacks. Check out the recipes below.

 

This Week’s Field Good’s Favorite
Gold Zucchini

goldenDesigner zucchini! Great for grilling. Cut into 1/4 inch slices length-wise, toss or brush with a little bit of oil and salt and pepper, then grill for about 5 minutes per side. Place in a bowl and toss with more oil. Add vinegar and herbs or Parmesan cheese.
Storage: If you wait to cut it, zucchini can last up to a week in the fridge. Wash and cut into 1-inch chunks and place in a zipper bag to freeze!

Grilled Zucchini and Summer squash
Fritters
Zucchini Oven Chips
Grilled Zucchini
Zucchini Parmesan Crisps
Roasted Zucchini, Onions and Peppers

 

 

 

 

 

 

Greens Means It’s Spring!

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Springtime is an incredibly cool food season. Firstly, because there’s finally green stuff (woo-woo!), but also because that green stuff grows in some interesting places– such as RAMPS! These are wild leeks that you have to hunt for in the woods. Because they’re such a coveted ingredient, foragers keep their looking places a secret! Pretty intense. Always be sure to wash and cook any foraged item. Happy foraging!

 

 

This Week’s Field Goods Favorite
Soldier Beans

soldier beansNOT dried and are pre-cooked. Perfect for baked beans and full of protein.
Storage: Pop in the freezer. Thaw to use.

Sweet and Spicy Dirty Rice with Beans and Greens
1 1/2 cups long-grain brown rice
3 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
1 tablespoon peanut oil
1 1/2 cups chopped yellow onion
10 ounces cooked chicken andouille, or other spicy chicken sausage, cut into 1/2-inch pieces (OPTIONAL)
1 cup chopped green bell pepper
1 cup chopped red bell pepper
2 cloves garlic, minced
½ cup apple, small dice
1 cup spinach and chard chopped, stems and leaf
1 cup soldier beans, cooked
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme leaves
1/4-1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
¼ cup apple cider vinegar
1/4 teaspoon salt

Directions:
Bring rice and broth to a boil in a large saucepan. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer at the lowest bubble until the water is absorbed and the rice is tender, about 50 minutes. Remove from the heat and let stand, covered, for 10 minutes.

While the rice is standing, heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat and add sausage (optional) and sear until browned. Add onion, green and red bell pepper and garlic and cook, stirring, until the onion is soft, about 5 minutes more. Add apples, greens and beans. Stir in thyme, cayenne and apple cider vinegar to taste and salt. Stir the vegetable mixture into the rice and serve.

 

 

Pickle That!!!

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Worried about getting through all the bounty of the season? Or better yet – worried you’ll miss all this good stuff when the season is over? Here’s a solution: pickling! It’s an easy process that allows you to savor all this good stuff. All you’ll need is vinegar, some herbs & spices, and jars. Here’s how to pickle strawberries, chard stems, radishes, and cucumbers. Try making your own pickles this week! (Use this as a reference for pickling ANY veggie.)

 

This Week’s Field Good’s Favorite
Strawberries

pickleThe season has emerged! Wash and enjoy raw, or slice and mix with lemon juice and sugar for a sweet snack.
Storage: Keep in the crisper up to 5 days. Keep very dry. Check for mold before storing – berries are very delicate!
Roasted Strawberries
Strawberry Spinach Salad with Almonds and Goat Cheese
Yogurt Dipped Berries
Strawberries with Lemon and Mint
Strawberry Puree Pancakes

Get Your Greens!

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Last week we really gave you the scoop on what to do with your greens. This week, we realized we didn’t dish on HOW you get your greens. You may have noticed these greens are a little damp in your bag. That’s because farmers harvested the morning of packing!! That morning, the farmer harvests the greens and dunks ’em in cold water to take the field heat out of them, and then they deliver the leaves  right to us. Be sure to store your greenery wrapped in a paper towel to absorb some of that moisture – and, of course, keep in the crisper. (Eat your leaves with every meal, whether it’s kale, bok choy, or lettuce!)

 

This Week’s Field Goods Favorite
Bok Choy 

bok choyThese leaves can be eaten raw, roasted, boiled, steamed, stir-fried, or deep-fried. The entire head can be eaten. To prepare, separate the leaves from the stalks, then rinse well and drain. Shred or cut across the leaves and cut the stalks into small slices along the diagonal. Great with a bit of garlic, ginger or soy sauce. Remember—you can eat the stalks raw, too!
Storage: Up to a week in the fridge.
Stir-Fried Udon Noodles with Bok Choy
Ginger-Sesame Bok Choy
Wilted Bok Choy with Soy Sauce and Cashews
Easy Bok Choy

 

 

This Green Is All the Rabe!

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What a plethora of greens available to us right now. They’re packed with nutrients and add some color to our plates. What do we do with all of ’em?? EVERYTHING. Try a new green, like purple kale or rabe. Braise and make a bed for your meats and seafood. Mix into beans & grains for a hearty hot or cold salad. Add raw to lettuce to pump up your salads! Make some unique pestos (all you really need is a green, nuts, oil & cheese). Grill your greens! STUFF IT: wrap greens around seasoned meat, rice, hummus for a nice snack… The possibilities are truly endless. Don’t get green overload – get cookin’!

 

This Week’s Field Goods Favorite
Broccoli Rabe

rabeDid you know that this leafy green is more closely related to turnips than broccoli? It is NOT supposed to have big flower heads like broccoli. To prepare, trim the stems, toss with garlic & olive oil, add a splash of liquid, and sauté for a few minutes (you do not need to peel the stems). Toss with pasta & some good Parmesan cheese or with rice & soy sauce.
Storage: A week in the fridge.

Braised Rabe:
Bring salted water to boil.
Add a bunch of broccoli rabe.
Boil 2 minutes.
Drain and squeeze moisture out of the broccoli rabe.
Heat 2 tablespoons of olive oil.
Add chopped garlic (as much as little as you like).
Add broccoli rabe and cook for about 4 minutes.
Grilled
with Sun-Dried Tomatoes
with Sun-Dried Tomatoes
Spaghetti